2009.02.17 16:17:53
Susan Jackman


Free PSD Twitter Icon

I call this one, Little Twit.  It's just a litte cutsie! Register and become a member to download this free PSD.

icon Twitter Icon (little twitt) (91.93 kB)


  Susan Jackman | Free Icons | Illustration | PSD files | Freebies | Design Resources
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2009.02.16 19:53:26
Susan Jackman

Paper inspired Twitter Icon

Registered users may download and use it as they wish.

icon Free Vector Twitter Icon (paper twitter) (123.18 kB)


  Free Icons | Freebies | Vectors | Susan Jackman | Design Resources
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2009.02.16 16:58:52
Susan Jackman

CSS Specificity, CSS Inheritance, and a few more CSS tips

You may have experienced the effects of specificity in a number of ways.  Perhaps you have applied a hover effect to a link only to be left scratching your head wondering why it’s not working.  Or perhaps you have noticed that if you move a declaration further down in your CSS file it magically seams to work.  Both of these examples are caused by CSS specificity, a difficult to understand concept for beginners and pros alike.

If you're using simple CSS documents, you may think that specificity really doesn't matter. But the larger and more complicated your CSS style sheets get, the more conflicts you're going to have.


  IE 6 | IE 7 | CSS | Tips | Susan Jackman
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2009.02.16 02:16:12
Susan Jackman

The biggest challenges that a design team must face

I think there are two big challenges faced by all teams. In-effective utilization or organization of timelines and poor communication.  These two issues work hand in hand against each other.  These issues are based on my experiences working online with virtual teams, but are also relevant for a design team that works in different rooms, floors, offices, and if any members are offsite completely.


  Collaboration | Web-based Communication | Web Development | Design Process | Susan Jackman
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2009.02.15 23:34:40
Susan Jackman

Has commercialism (advertiser's control) corrupted or enhanced quality and integrity?

Advertisers do try to influence the content of publications. A beer producer may pressure a magazine in which it buys ad space not to print articles on the dangers of drinking, or an airline may demand that their advertisements be withdrawn from publications that report airplane crashes.  It is true that the Chrysler Corporation has asked magazines to inform it about material that involves sexual, political, or social issues that might be considered provocative or offensive; and Proctor and Gamble does not want its advertisements placed near articles or advertisements about gun control, abortion, the occult, cults, or the disparagement of religion.  But does this affect the quality and integrity of the publication?  Which will remain in the publication, the advertisement or the object of the advertisers concern.


  Internet | Reading habits | Marketing | Susan Jackman
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